Browsing articles in "Malaria"
20 April 2016
Shawn Clackett

What’s the Buzz? Dame Quentin Bryce Launches International Malaria Congress in Brisbane

ICTMM

BRISBANE – On Friday 15 April, The Honorable Dame Quentin Bryce AD, CVO, Australia’s 25th Governor-General, officially launched the International Congress for Tropical Medicine and Malaria 2016.

The launch took place at the Queensland Gallery of Modern Art. Hosted by Professor Cheryl Jones, President of the Australian Society for Infectious Diseases (ASID) and Professor David Emery, President of the Australian Society for Parasitology along with Associate Professor Helen Evans, from the Advisory Council of Pacific Friends of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

Ms Michelle Aldridge recounted her personal experience with malaria, which she contracted while volunteering in the Solomon Islands in 2012.

Expert panel moderated by Dr Norman Swan, Host, ABC RN Health Report consisted of Professor Maxine Whittaker (James Cook University), Professor James McCarthy (QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute), Associate Professor (Hon) Helen Evans (Pacific Friends of the Global Fund), Rev Tim Costello (World Vision Australia), Dr Ben Rolfe (Asia Pacific Leaders Malaria Alliance, APLMA) and Professor Sharon Lewin (the Doherty Institute) discussed the importance and significance of the congress, the breakthroughs in malaria, health security within Australia and the need to continue funding the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

The number of deaths caused by malaria declined 48 percent between 2000 and 2014. The number of lives saved by malaria treatment and prevention has grown steadily each year. Children under the age of five are the most vulnerable to malaria, because their immune systems are still developing effective resistance to the disease. Pregnant women are also vulnerable, because their immune systems are weakened during pregnancy. Protecting young children and pregnant women is paramount to any disease strategy.

The innovation of a long-lasting insecticidal mosquito net, at a relatively low cost, has greatly expanded protection for children and families. With more than 548 million mosquito nets distributed, people at risk for malaria who gained access to mosquito nets grew from 7 percent in 2005 to 36 percent in 2010 and 56 percent in 2014 in countries where the Global Fund invests.

 

7 April 2016
Shawn Clackett

A New Era for Roll Back Malaria: Announcement of the New Board

The Roll Back Malaria (RBM) Partnership has named a new board to lead the global organization into a new era and drive momentum to end malaria for good.

The intensified, collaborative effort by RBM partners to support affected countries to end malaria is saving millions of lives, increasing attendance at school, improving worker productivity and boosting local economies. But malaria remains a serious public health threat. Eliminating malaria is critical to achieving the Sustainable Development Goals, and must remain a key priority for the global development community.

In the middle of December 2013, the RBM Board commissioned an external evaluation to ensure the Partnership was well positioned to drive continued momentum towards a malaria-free world This evaluation concluded that significant adjustments to RBM’s structure would be necessary to sustain its successes and build on them to deliver on the ambitious goals and objectives of the 2030 WHO Global Technical Strategy (GTS) and accompanying RBM Action and Investment to defeat Malaria (AIM).

After a period of extensive consultation, the RBM Board agreed at its 29th Meeting in December 2015 on a new governance architecture. This included the establishment of a reconstituted Partnership Board, which could take advantage of the tremendous skill, energy and effectiveness of its partners and lead the organization into a new era with a focus on ending malaria. As a result, a transparent public nomination process was announced in January 2016 to identify outstanding new Board members.

The response to the call for nominations was overwhelming: more than 100 nominations were received from the wide malaria and related multi-sectoral community, including government, civil society, non-government organisations, the private sector, donor funding organisations (governmental, multilateral or private philanthropic), and research and academia.

After a robust assessment and selection process 13 individuals have been chosen to take the revitalised Partnership forward, along with an additional Board member to be named by the WHO:

  • Mr Elhadj As Sy, Secretary General, International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies
  • Mr Simon Bland, Director – New York Office, UNAIDS
  • Prof Awa Coll-Seck, Minister of Health & Social Welfare, Senegal
  • Mr Kieran Daly, Deputy Director: Global Policy & Advocacy – Malaria, HIV, TB and the Global Fund, Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Mr Paolo Gomes, Chairman, Paulo Gomes and Partners, former Executive Director, World Bank
  • Dr Richard Nchabi Kamwi, Elimination 8 Ambassador, former Minister of Health, Namibia
  • Dr Altaf Lal, Senior Advisor on Global Health and Innovation, Sun Pharmaceuticals Industries
  • Dr Winnie Mpanju-Shumbusho, former Assistant Director General – Malaria, HIV, TB, NTDs, WHO
  • Mr Ray Nishimoto, President of Health & Crop Sciences Sector, Sumitomo Chemical
  • Dr David Reddy, Chief Executive, Medicines for Malaria Venture
  • Mr Gu Xueming, President of the Chinese Academy of International Trade and Economic Cooperation
  • HE Yongyuth Yuthavong, Deputy Prime Minister, Thailand
  • Rear Admiral Tim Ziemer USN (ret), Global Co-ordinator, US President’s Malaria Initiative

This new Partnership Board includes individuals with deep expertise and experience at a senior decision-making level as well as representation from across the Partnership, including malaria-affected countries, private sector, civil society, donor funding organisations, and entities outside the malaria and health sectors, civil society and donors.

In confirming the result of the vote the current Board Chair the Honorable Victor Makwenge Kaput stated that he believed that the individuals selected:
Represented an impressive group of distinctly qualified individuals who will be well-positioned to take the RBM Partnership to a new level in its evolution.

The new Board are expected to assume responsibility for leading the Partnership from April 2016 and RBM are confident that the changes to the architecture of the Partnership will result in a strengthened malaria partnership well-positioned to support the delivery of the ambitious goal of Ending Malaria for Good.

11 February 2016
Shawn Clackett

Deal on Mosquito Nets to Yield $93 million in Savings

malaria nets

GENEVA – As part of a new framework for procuring health products in the most cost-effective and sustainable way, the Global Fund has reached an agreement to purchase insecticide-treated mosquito nets that prevent malaria with projected savings of US$93 million over two years.

By achieving sharply lower prices for nets – a 38 percent reduction from 2013 – the agreement serves the Global Fund’s goal of accelerating progress against malaria, a preventable disease that most seriously affects young children and pregnant women. Building on the Global Fund’s large-scale purchasing power, the framework improves the supply of an important tool to fight the epidemic.

The Global Fund projects US$350 million in mosquito net purchases over the next two years through its Pooled Procurement Mechanism. A tender process has selected 10 suppliers and includes volume commitments from the Global Fund and performance contracts from the suppliers.

The agreement creates a level of certainty for suppliers, allowing them greater visibility and planning time to manufacture and deliver nets. That facilitates lower prices, and yields significant savings for the Global Fund partnership. The US$93 million in projected savings is equivalent to about 40 million additional nets.

“The money saved here can buy more nets,” said Christopher Game, Chief Procurement Officer at the Global Fund. “We worked closely with partners to strike the balance between achieving cost savings, promoting sustainable supply, and recognizing manufacturer investment in the development of new products to fight malaria.”

A previous Global Fund procurement tender for insecticide-treated mosquito nets was concluded in late 2013 and implemented over 2014-2015. That agreement saw the successful purchase of 170 million nets at a stable price, with a major improvement in delivery times.

The agreement is geared to purchase nets from multiple suppliers, reducing risk and encouraging local production, which reduces transport costs. About one-fifth of the nets to be procured will be manufactured in Africa. For the first time, the nets will be color-coded, allowing their durability to be tested at six-month intervals. The data collected from this research creates the possibility for future product innovation.

5 February 2016
Shawn Clackett

British Government and Bill Gates Announce £3bn to Fight Malaria

The Guardian — UK
25 January 2016

Girl in bed net

The British chancellor, George Osborne, and the Microsoft founder, Bill Gates, have unveiled a plan to spend billions to defeat “the world’s deadliest killer” malaria. Osborne and Gates announced £3bn (US$4.28bn) in funding over the next five years for research and to support efforts to eliminate the mosquito-borne disease.  “When it comes to human tragedy, no creature comes close to the devastation caused by the mosquito,” the two wrote in a joint article in the Times. “We both believe that a malaria-free world has to be one of the highest global health priorities.” The fund would be made up of £500m a year from Britain’s overseas aid budget for the next five years, as well as $200m this year from the Gates Foundation, with more donations to follow.

Full story

27 January 2016
Shawn Clackett

Latest Global Fund Results

See full story at http://www.theglobalfund.org/en/results/

Malaria Photo

The Global Fund’s cumulative results, as of end 2015, show strong progress in supporting programs that aim to end HIV, tuberculosis and malaria as epidemics. The latest results show that Global Fund grants have supported:

8.6 million people currently on treatment for HIV

 

3.3 million HIV-positive women receiving treatment to prevent HIV transmission during pregnancy

 

470 million people conciliated and tested for HIV

 

7.8 million orphans and vulnerable children provided with care and support

 

5.2 billion condoms distributed

 

16 million people treated for TB/HIV co-infection

 

15 million cases of tuberculosis treated

 

230,000 people treated for multidrug-resistant TB

 

600 million mosquito nets distributed

 

61 million homes and buildings sprayed to eliminate mosquitoes

 

560 million people treated for malaria

 

470 million disease prevention activities

 

29 million HIV-positive people receiving care and support

 

16.1 million training sessions for health workers

 

 

Pacific Friends operates as a program within the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales.

Pacific Friends

Professor Janice Reid AC
Chair
Bill Bowtell AO
Executive Director

Pacific Friends of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a high-level advocacy organisation which seeks to mobilise regional awareness of the serious threat posed by HIV & AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria to societies and economies in the Pacific. In pursuing its goals Pacific Friends has a specific interest in highlighting the need to protect the rights of women and children in the Pacific.

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