Browsing articles in "Malaria"
10 February 2017
Shawn Clackett

Malaria-carrying Mosquitoes Becoming Resistant to Bed Nets in Southern Africa

FILE - An Afghan girl sleeps beneath a mosquito net at her home in Kabul, Afghanistan, July 21, 2016.

An Afghan girl sleeps beneath a mosquito net at her home in Kabul, Afghanistan, July 21, 2016.

VOA
By Jessica Berman

Malaria-carrying mosquitoes are becoming resistant to the insecticide used in bed nets to prevent the disease. Researchers say it is important to stay ahead of the resistance to avoid what they are calling a public health catastrophe.

Bed nets treated with inexpensive pyrethroid insecticides are the main defense against biting, malaria-carrying mosquitoes, and they have significantly cut down on the number of cases. The World Health Organization reports malaria infected an estimated 212 million people in 2015, killing some 429,000 of them.

That reflects a 21 percent drop in the incidence of between 2010 and 2015.

But a new study, published in the journal PLoS Genetics, found that the primary mosquito that harbors the parasite in southern Africa, Anopheles funestus, is rapidly becoming resistant to the insecticide. In at least one country, Mozambique, researchers discovered that 100 percent of A. funestus remained alive after direct exposure to the chemical.

Full story

23 January 2017
Shawn Clackett

Roll Back Malaria (RBM) Partnership Board Appoints New CEO

Dr Kesetebirhan Admasu, Newly Appointed Chief Executive Officer

The Roll Back Malaria (RBM) Partnership Board is delighted to announce the appointment of Dr Kesetebirhan Admasu to the role of Chief Executive Officer (CEO).

The RBM Board unanimously selected the exceptional Dr. Kesete for the role of RBM CEO at the 4th Partnership Board Meeting, following an extensive global search and selection process supported by executive search firm Egon Zehnder.

Dr Kesete will play a critical role as the global face of the new Partnership on a day-to-day basis, including establishing and leading a new Partnership Management Team and ensuring that regions and countries are empowered to address the global fight against malaria.

Dr. Winnie Mpanju-Shumbusho, Board Chair of the RBM Partnership said “As a champion of innovation, task-shifting and implementation at scale, Dr Kesete has the experience required to lead this global Partnership into a new era and drive momentum to end malaria for good. We are incredibly excited to welcome him on board.”

Dr Kesete will officially commence duties on 1 February 2017 and move into the new RBM offices at the Global Fund in Geneva on 1 March 2017. The RBM Board Leadership will support him in the phased recruitment of remaining members of the new Partnership Management Team over the course of 2017.

“I am excited to join RBM Partnership as the CEO. I look forward to working with all the RBM partners in the effort to relegate malaria into the history books.” – Dr. Kesetebirhan Admasu

15 November 2016
Shawn Clackett

Global Fund Board Meets in Switzerland

This week, the Board of the The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria will meet in Switzerland to decide how much money countries around the world will receive to help the millions of people living with these deadly diseases.

In September, the Global Fund Replenishment raised over $12.9 billion over three years of which Australia committed AUD $220 million.

  • TB kills one person every 18 seconds
  • AIDS kills one person every 20 seconds
  • Malaria kills one person every 30 seconds (mainly children under 5 years old)

It is time to #EndItForGood

1 July 2016
Guest Contributor

Home Tests for Malaria and Cancer Doable with Cheap Paper Strips

Jun 29, 2016 10:35 AM EDT
Nature World News
Malaria In Arakan State In Burma

A Rohingya girl is held by her mother as she gets her finger pricked for the malaria test at special clinic for malaria in Arakan state, Myanmar (Burma). A new system using paper strips can make malaria testing a lot cheaper. (Photo : Paula Bronstein / Staff)

Home testing of various diseases, including cancer, may get a lot easier and cheaper following the lead of a new malaria diagnostic system. Ohio State University (OSU) broke the news that its laboratory is developing paper strips that can detect diseases like malaria as easily as using a drugstore pregnancy test.

Not everyone can afford hospital medical tests, and that’s particularly true of the impoverished living in developing countries. The OSU chemists said that their system will make it affordable for anyone to get medically tested, at costs as low as 50 cents per strip.

Abraham Badu-Tawiah from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at OSU offered an explanation of the detection procedure.

“To get tested, all a person would have to do is put a drop of blood on the paper strip, fold it in half, put it in an envelope and mail it,” he said. A person could easily apply the blood sample at home, with no need to visit a clinic. Samples would be sent out to a designated laboratory following a regular schedule. Only if a strip tested positive for disease would the tested have to consult a doctor.

The OSU researchers’ investigation showed that the test remained accurate even after a month had passed since the fresh blood sample was applied to the strip. This makes it a boon to healthcare workers providing medical services to populations in underdeveloped and remote areas. The paper strip test could prove a vital weapon to combat the scourge of malaria, which threatens many communities in rural parts of Africa and southeast Asia.

19 May 2016
Shawn Clackett

See how far the world’s come in the Fight to #EndMalaria

Pacific Friends operates as a program within the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales.

Pacific Friends

Professor Janice Reid AC
Chair
Bill Bowtell AO
Executive Director

Pacific Friends of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a high-level advocacy organisation which seeks to mobilise regional awareness of the serious threat posed by HIV & AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria to societies and economies in the Pacific. In pursuing its goals Pacific Friends has a specific interest in highlighting the need to protect the rights of women and children in the Pacific.

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