Browsing articles in "Friends of the Global Fund"
18 February 2014
Shawn Clackett

A Winning Team – A Guest Blog from Friends of the Global Fight

By Deb Derrick, President of Friends of the Global Fight Against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

I’m not what you would call a sports fanatic by any means. But in the midst of the Olympics — and not too long after the Super Bowl — it’s hard not to get caught up in the energy and enthusiasm for great personal and team performances. It’s a reminder that a critical component for these achievements is bringing the best possible team to the field (or slopes; or rink). A great team is capable of achieving things never thought possible. And that is no less the case with respect to global health.

Winning the fights against the world’s most challenging global health threats — including HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria — requires an unmatched team, with players who each bring different, but equally valuable skills to bear.

The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is an integral part of this team. The world’s largest public health financier, the Global Fund supports programs that save 100,000 lives per month. Created in 2002 to help provide resources to win the battle against the three diseases, which were collectively killing 6 million people annually, the Global Fund now provides:

•       More than 20 percent of global funding for HIV/AIDS;

•       More than 50 percent of international financing for malaria; and

•       The overwhelming majority of international funding for tuberculosis.

What is most exciting is that, today, defeating these three diseases is a real possibility. Only a few years ago, we could not have made that statement. In the last 20 years, tuberculosis deaths have decreased by more than 40 percent. In the last decade alone, HIV incidence rates have gone down 33 percent and the number of malaria cases has been reduced by 26 percent.

But defeating these diseases is the fight of a generation and the Global Fund isn’t doing it alone. It was conceived as a partnership model, relying on donor and implementing countries — those receiving grants from the Global Fund — as well as the private sector, among others, to mobilize resources and conduct life-saving work on the ground.

Last December, the Global Fund hosted what, in the sports world, might be considered its “big game.” At its Fourth Voluntary Replenishment Conference, donors from around the world came together and pledged $12 billion to Global Fund programs, the largest amount ever committed to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria and a 30 percent increase over the 2010 pledges of U.S. $9.2 billion. This achievement was the result of the generosity of 25 donor countries, as well as corporations and foundations, high-net-worth individuals and faith-based organizations. Some implementing countries also pledged to contribute more resources.

Far from December being the end of resource mobilization, though, the Global Fund continues raising funds for its life-saving mission. Since then, more countries have added their names to the pledge list: Switzerland, for example, pledged $68 million to the Global Fund in mid-December, nearly tripling its past contribution – a commitment that “unlocked” additional funding from the United States and United Kingdom.

Then, on Super Bowl Sunday, one of the most watched programs of the year also served as a call to action in the fight against AIDS. In a commercial that aired during halftime, U2 performed its song, “Invisible,” which, through a partnership with (RED) and Bank of America (BOA), was available for free for 36 hours on iTunes. For every download, BOA donated $1 to the Global Fund. Although originally only planning to match up to $2 million, Bank of America generously continued donating through the following Monday night for a final tally of more than $3 million. BOA’s partnership with (RED) and U2 intends to deliver a total of $10 million to the Global Fund that, with matching contributions from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the multinational software company SAP and Africa’s Motsepe family, will add up to another $22 million.

It’s worth noting, though, that the Global Fund’s partnerships extend beyond mobilizing resources to doing more with the resources it already has. Nowhere is this more clearly illustrated than in recent changes related to procurement. For example, a unique partnership to procure quality nets to combat malaria — leveraging the collective purchasing power of the Global Fund, the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development, the U.S. President’s Malaria Initiative and the United Nations Children’s Fund —  will result in a projected $140 million in savings over two years. That is money that can then be used to save more lives. Similar reforms are underway in the procurement of antiretroviral drugs, prevention and diagnostic tools in partnership with the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief and the South African government.

Unlike sports teams, there is no cap on the number of players who can join the fight against AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. And, in fact, the more players we have — bilateral partners, traditional donor and implementing countries, the private sector and passionate individuals — the better our odds of beating these three diseases.

There is no question that the athletes that took part in the Super Bowl and those competing in Olympic events are world class. But the world’s best team may not necessarily be found on a field, slope or rink. It may be the one on the global stage conducting the fight of a generation against these three deadly diseases.

30 January 2014
Shawn Clackett

Communities Delegation Condemns Signing of Sam Sex Marriage [Prohibition] Act 2014

global fund communities delegation

The Communities Delegation to the Board of the Global Fund condemns the signing into law of the Same Sex [Prohibition] Act 2014 by the Nigerian President, Dr. Goodluck Jonathan.

Same Sex Marriage [Prohibition] Act 2014

The Act bans marriages or civil unions between persons of the same sex within Nigeria and void any such marriages and civil unions entered legally in other countries. The law goes further to criminalise the registration
of ‘gay clubs, societies and organisations, their subsistence, possessions and meetings’ and bans the ‘public show of same sex amorous relationship either directly or indirectly’. The law provides a sentence of 10 years imprisonment to any person or group of persons that ‘witness, abets and aids the solemnisation of a same sex union or supports the registration of gay clubs, societies and organisations, processions or meetings’.

The Communities Delegation urges the Government of the Federal Republic of Nigeria to consider the implications of this law on the fundamental rights of Nigerian citizens who will become targets of abuse, violence and other human rights violations of the basis of their real or perceived sexual orientation or gender identity.

Nigeria has the second largest HIV epidemic globally and is the recipient of over US$1.5 billion from the Global Fund, with 17 active grants in place, and 8 of the grants on HIV/AIDS. The Communities Delegation is extremely concerned of the consequences this act will have in preventing access to essential HIV services for communities of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT), and undermine Nigeria’s efforts in the Comprehensive Response Plan for HIV/AIDS to address the high burden of HIV among key populations, impeding efforts and reversing the gains and progress made so far in the fight against HIV/AIDS in Nigeria.

The Communities Delegation is committed to ensure that all programmes funded by the Global Fund operate in, and contribute to environments that respect and value human rights to ensure that Global Fund investments are finance programmes that provide rights based access to prevention, treatment, care and support.

The Communities Delegation calls on the Global Fund to urgently identify mechanisms of direct support for the LGBT community in Nigeria, and to actively and closely monitor all Global Fund grants in Nigeria for human right violations and to take immediate action where such violations are clear.

We also urge and call on all partners including UNAIDS and bilateral programmes to directly advocate with the Nigerian government on this issue to honour its domestic and international obligations and commitments to respect, protect and ensure the fulfilment of rights of all people within its territory, and to protect minority groups from violence and discrimination by taking proactive steps to put in place measures that prevent the violation of their rights.

For more information about this news release: Please contact the Communities Delegation (Rachel Ong, Communications Focal Point by email , or phone +41 (22) 575 4822.

The role of the Communities living with HIV, Tuberculosis (TB) and affected by malaria Delegation (Communities Delegation) is to advocate, influence and shape the decisions on the Board of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tb and Malaria (Global Fund). This is so that communities living with HIV, TB and malaria can gain equitable access to quality services and support needed to prevent, treat and/or live with these infections within a conducive environment that respects human rights.

28 January 2014
Shawn Clackett

Reason to Celebrate in the New Year: $12 Billion to Fight AIDS, TB & Malaria

By Deborah Derrick
President, Friends of the Global Fight Against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

With the holidays behind us, returning to our day-to-day lives may almost seem anticlimactic. For those of us working in global health, however, New Year’s festivities started early and the excitement is likely to continue well into 2014. On December 3, the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria announced that it had mobilized an unprecedented commitment of $12 billion from donors. The conference at which this announcement was made — the launch of the Global Fund’s Fourth Voluntary Replenishment — provided not only a time to celebrate, but also an opportunity to anticipate more progress saving lives in the months ahead.

The Global Fund is the world’s largest public health financier, supporting programs that save 100,000 lives per month. Created in 2002 to help provide resources to win the battle against the three diseases, which were collectively killing 6 million people annually, the Global Fund now provides:

• More than 20 percent of global funding for HIV/AIDS
• More than 50 percent of international financing for malaria
• The overwhelming majority of international funding for tuberculosis

At the Global Fund’s replenishment conference in December, donors from around the world made financial commitments that will span the next three years, from 2014-2016. The $12 billion raised was the largest amount ever committed to fight the three diseases. It marked a 30 percent increase over the $9.2 billion secured during the Global Fund’s last replenishment in 2010 and was a result of the generosity of 25 donor countries, as well as corporations and foundations, high-net-worth individuals and faith-based organizations. In addition, many implementing countries — those receiving grants from the Global Fund — pledged to increase their own resources, adding further fuel to the fight.

Investments in the Global Fund

Dr. Mark Dybul, Executive Director of the Global Fund, characterized the meeting as not only a replenishment of financial resources but also a replenishment of hope, saying, “The 21st Century ideals that led to the founding of the Global Fund are now stronger than ever: partnership, shared responsibility and mutual accountability.”

The hope Dr. Dybul referred to is evidenced by the remarkable progress made in the past 20 years. In that time, tuberculosis deaths have decreased by more than 40 percent. In the past decade alone, HIV incidence is down by 33 percent and cases of malaria have dropped by 26 percent. Today, the end of these diseases is truly within sight.

Here in the United States, we were thrilled at the level of commitment to Replenishment. Of course, the U.S. government has been the largest contributor to the Global Fund since it was established. The announcement by President Obama that the U.S. will commit $1 for every $2 matched by other donors worldwide — up to $5 billion — was further illustration of this leadership. It also marks a potential $1 billion increase from the Administration’s previous pledge to the Global Fund for the 2010-2013 timeframe.

Notwithstanding this very successful pledging moment, the replenishment conference marked only the beginning of a rolling, three-year campaign to raise funds. The Global Fund will continue to work with donors and partners in its efforts to defeat AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Nafsiah Mboi, Chair of the Board of the Global Fund, who led the pledging session, put it this way: “We’ve had a terrific beginning. Now let’s go to work.”

In the years ahead, the Global Fund will deepen its work with donor governments; encourage increased private sector and high-net-worth individual investments, as well as domestic co-financing; and work to ensure treatment, prevention and care continue to reach those most in need. But this current moment is certainly one to celebrate — the beginning of a New Year in which our collective resolution is to control these three diseases once and for all. And, with replenishment efforts already well underway and increasing levels of support for the Global Fund worldwide, this is one resolution that we can hope to keep.

10 January 2014
Shawn Clackett

Friends Applauds White House Nomination of Dr. Deborah Birx as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator

friendsGlobalFight

FRIENDS OF THE GLOBAL FIGHT
AGAINST AIDS, TUBERCULOSIS AND MALARIA

Friends of the Global Fight works to end the worldwide burden of AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. We educate, engage and mobilize U.S. decision makers to support the Global Fund, the world’s largest public health financier. For more information about Friends of the Global Fight, visit www.theglobalfight.org.

Dr. Deborah Birx

Washington, D.C., January 9, 2014 — Friends of the Global Fight Against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria applauds today’s White House nomination of Dr. Deborah Birx as the next U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator — a position charged with leading the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) and overseeing the U.S. relationship with the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the world’s largest public health financier.

“Dr. Birx brings a wealth of scientific, leadership and implementation experience,” said Deborah Derrick, President of Friends of the Global Fight Against AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, praising the nomination. “Friends looks forward to working with Dr. Birx and continuing strong Global Fund and PEPFAR collaboration under her stewardship.”

Launched with bipartisan support in 2003, PEPFAR is the largest single-country initiative in history to tackle one disease. The U.S. program and the Global Fund together provide the overwhelming majority of international AIDS relief. The two work hand-in-hand around the world, where, in collaboration with local partners, they have helped save millions of lives.

If confirmed, Dr. Birx will succeed Ambassador Eric Goosby, M.D., who served as U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator between 2009 and 2013 and Deborah von Zinkernagel, who has been serving in an interim capacity as Coordinator since October.

Dr. Birx has spent three decades combating HIV/AIDS with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and Department of Defense. She is a trained clinician in immunology and a widely respected HIV/AIDS expert and currently serves as Director of the Division of Global HIV/AIDS in the CDC’s Center for Global Health.

“The world has now reached a critical moment in the fight against HIV/AIDS,” said Derrick. “I look forward to a speedy confirmation process for Dr. Birx and to continued joint efforts to contain and ultimately defeat this disease.”

6 January 2014
Shawn Clackett

Fourth Voluntary Global Fund Replenishment Pledges

Washington, D.C. – On 2-3 December 2013, world leaders gathered in Washington D.C. to demonstrate global unity in a launch of funding commitments for the fight against AIDS, TB and malaria over the next three years. An initial amount US$12.0 billion was pledged in contributions from 25 countries, as well as the European Commission, private foundations, corporations and faith-based organizations. That represented the largest amount ever committed to fight against AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. It was a 30 percent increase over the US$9.2 billion in firm pledges secured in 2010 at the start of the 2011-2013 period.

At the Replenishment launch, global leaders voiced a broad consensus that we are at a historic moment in the fight to defeat AIDS, TB and malaria. Scientific advances are giving us the ability to completely control these diseases. Harnessing these funds, we can make a transformational difference in the lives of millions of people.

Note: Amounts represent nominal pledges and may be modified, up or down, to reflect donor-specified and other adjustments as the case may be.

DONOR GOVERNMENTS 2014-2016 in millions
(Donor Currency)
2014-2016 in millions (USD)
Australia AUD 200.0 182.2
Belgium EUR 38.0 51.6
Canada CAD 650.0 612.3
China 15
Denmark DKK 495.00 90.2
European Commission EUR 370.0 502.9
France EUR 1,080.0 1,467.80
Germany EUR 600.0 815.4
India  – 13.5
Ireland EUR 30.0 40.8
Italy EUR 100.0 135.9
Japan  – 800
Kenya  – 2
Korea (ROK)  – 12
Kuwait  – 1.5
Liechtenstein CHF 0.2 0.2
Luxembourg EUR 7.5 10.2
Malawi  – 0.5
Netherlands EUR 185.0 251.4
Nigeria  – 30
Norway NOK 1,700.0 277.4
Saudi Arabia  – 25
Sweden SKK 2,500.0 380.8
Thailand  – 4.5
United Kingdom GBP 1,000.0 1,636.90
United States of America  – 4,002.30
Cote d’Ivoire (D2H*, Germany) XOF 3,109.2 6.4
Indonesia (D2H*, Australia) EUR 3.4 4.7
Indonesia (D2H*, Australia)  – 5.4
PRIVATE SECTOR DONORS
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) Promissory Note 300
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) Cash 200
Chevron 5
BHP Billiton 10
Ecobank 3
RED (Consumer Marketing Initiatives) 40
Takeda Pharmaceutical 3
Vale 3
United Methodist Church 19.9
Tahir Foundation 39
Other 5
TOTAL AMOUNT

23,006.90

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Pacific Friends operates as a program within the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales.

Pacific Friends

Professor Janice Reid AC
Chair
Bill Bowtell AO
Executive Director

Pacific Friends of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a high-level advocacy organisation which seeks to mobilise regional awareness of the serious threat posed by HIV & AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria to societies and economies in the Pacific. In pursuing its goals Pacific Friends has a specific interest in highlighting the need to protect the rights of women and children in the Pacific.

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