25 August 2016
Shawn Clackett

Meet the Generation that can end AIDS

 

HIV affects millions of young people around the world, but with the right treatment and care, they can still go on to achieve their dreams and live life to the fullest. Lerato, from South Africa is no different. Despite being born with HIV, she is determined not to let it beat her. She wakes up every day with a drive to achieve her goals

22 August 2016
Shawn Clackett

Usher and Global Citizen team up to support the Global Fund

Global Citizen

MONTREAL
– The international advocacy organization Global Citizen in support of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria announced that Usher, Half Moon Run, Metric, Grimes, and Charlotte Cardin will headline a free-ticketed concert on Saturday, September 17, at the Bell Centre in Montreal. With Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Bill Gates, Co-Founder of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, attending as special guests, the event will celebrate progress in global health and development.

Fans and activists can start earning their tickets by joining the Global Citizen movement at www.globalcitizen.org/canada, where they can take action in support of the Global Fund, a partnership of governments, civil society, the private sector and people affected by AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria united to end these epidemics by 2030.

1 July 2016
Guest Contributor

Home Tests for Malaria and Cancer Doable with Cheap Paper Strips

Jun 29, 2016 10:35 AM EDT
Nature World News
Malaria In Arakan State In Burma

A Rohingya girl is held by her mother as she gets her finger pricked for the malaria test at special clinic for malaria in Arakan state, Myanmar (Burma). A new system using paper strips can make malaria testing a lot cheaper. (Photo : Paula Bronstein / Staff)

Home testing of various diseases, including cancer, may get a lot easier and cheaper following the lead of a new malaria diagnostic system. Ohio State University (OSU) broke the news that its laboratory is developing paper strips that can detect diseases like malaria as easily as using a drugstore pregnancy test.

Not everyone can afford hospital medical tests, and that’s particularly true of the impoverished living in developing countries. The OSU chemists said that their system will make it affordable for anyone to get medically tested, at costs as low as 50 cents per strip.

Abraham Badu-Tawiah from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at OSU offered an explanation of the detection procedure.

“To get tested, all a person would have to do is put a drop of blood on the paper strip, fold it in half, put it in an envelope and mail it,” he said. A person could easily apply the blood sample at home, with no need to visit a clinic. Samples would be sent out to a designated laboratory following a regular schedule. Only if a strip tested positive for disease would the tested have to consult a doctor.

The OSU researchers’ investigation showed that the test remained accurate even after a month had passed since the fresh blood sample was applied to the strip. This makes it a boon to healthcare workers providing medical services to populations in underdeveloped and remote areas. The paper strip test could prove a vital weapon to combat the scourge of malaria, which threatens many communities in rural parts of Africa and southeast Asia.

20 June 2016
Guest Contributor

Inequality Preventing Us from Eradicating AIDS

The Guardian Global development
By Lilianne Ploumen
09 June 2016

A woman pictured during a march in the run-up to World Aids Day, in Yangon, 2013

There was a time when we could say that humanity had no control over Aids, but this is no longer true. Yet only last year, 1.1 million people died of Aids-related illnesses, and 2.1 million more were infected with HIV. An estimated 19.7 million people living with HIV are not receiving antiretroviral treatment. This is not due to our inability to tackle Aids; rather, it is a manifestation of inequality in all its forms – social, cultural, economic and gender-based.

It isn’t lack of drugs preventing us eradicating AIDS, but inequality.

Often, different forms of inequality go hand-in-hand: rape survivors, for instance, run an extra high risk of being infected with HIV. More often than not they are poor – and so are their rapists. Once infected, they are very likely to become ill and die and, although there are medicines to prevent this, many people don’t have access to them.  This inequality doesn’t only affect the world’s poorest regions. About 60% of people with HIV live in middle-income countries. That figure illustrates an alarming phenomenon: although inequality between countries is fading, inequality within countries is growing. On the one hand, incomes in middle-income countries are rising, a middle class is emerging and healthcare is improving. On the other hand large groups of people are not benefiting from this progress.

Full story

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Pacific Friends operates as a program within the Kirby Institute at the University of New South Wales.

Pacific Friends

Professor Janice Reid AC
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Bill Bowtell AO
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Pacific Friends of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a high-level advocacy organisation which seeks to mobilise regional awareness of the serious threat posed by HIV & AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria to societies and economies in the Pacific. In pursuing its goals Pacific Friends has a specific interest in highlighting the need to protect the rights of women and children in the Pacific.

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